Notes from Kegan’s ‘The Evolving Self’ 7: institutionalism

8 – The Growth and Loss of the Institutional Self

This is the penultimate chapter of the book, focusing on the final phase of transition to developmental maturity.

This is the final progression, away from a biased emphasis on either interconnectedness or autonomy – but the movement is towards communion, away from separation.

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Notes from Kegan’s ‘The Evolving Self’ 6: Stage transition 3 to 4

7 – The Growth and Loss of the Interpersonal Self

This chapter documents the key stage change from 3 to 4: leaving behind the interpersonal as predominantly influential, moving toward a new balance characterized by self-authorship and psychological autonomy. The stage parallels the earlier developmental path between impulsiveness and imperialism.

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Notes from Kegan’s ‘The Evolving Self’ 5: Chapter 6

6 – The Growth and Loss of the Imperial Self

This chapter is on how the move from stage 2 (imperial) to stage 3 (interpersonal) comes about.

The 8 year old boy at the end of the last chapter had preserved his dignity. Years of hard won differentiation stood behind the ‘you’ in his sentence “I see you still have that old cat.” But the impulse has now been brought to the status of object and there is a new, continuing sense about things and people. P161 Continue reading

Notes from Kegan’s ‘The Evolving Self’ 4: Chapters 4 and 5

Part Two: The Natural Emergencies of the Self

My notes from here on are from the second part of The Evolving Self. This section of the book moves from taxonomy to ontogeny. “If persons simply remained forever in one or another of these evolutionary truces, then understanding another might only be a matter of grasping their underlying psychologic. But these self-other distinctions are in fact tenuous, fragile, precarious states.”

The whole of the second part of the book is about the experience of the process of change. Continue reading

Notes from Kegan’s ‘The Evolving Self’ 3: Chapter 3

Code:

“..”             direct quote from book, with page no.

*             my own thought, idea or opinion

No code = summary or paraphrase of content

3 – The Constitutions of the Self

This chapter explains the driving force behind the evolution of meaning-making: the human universal of apparently contradictory needs for agency and communion (independence and interdependence).

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Notes from Kegan’s ‘The Evolving Self’ 2: Chapters 1 & 2

This set of notes are from the first two chapters of The Evolving Self.

Code:

“..”             direct quote from book, with page no.

*             my own thought, idea or opinion

No code = summary or paraphrase of content

Part One: Evolutionary Truces

1 – The unrecognized Genius of Jean Piaget

This chapter considers meaning-making in the context of biological construction – the development of human psychology from birth to adulthood.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Piaget

Piaget brought together the constructivist theme from philosophy and developmental theme from biology. Psychology is implicit in his work, and Kegan sees himself as drawing it out and elaborating it. Piaget called himself a ‘genetic epistemologist’ rather than a psychologist. Pg. 26

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Notes from Kegan’s ‘The Evolving Self’ 1: preface and prologue

I enjoyed Silver V’s writing at Rival Voices and was sad when s/he stopped blogging. David @meaningness Chapman had some good conversations with Silver V in the comments section of Rival Voices. One of them was about Robert Kegan’s work in developmental psychology. Unfortunately I can’t find it to link to. He (@meaningness) recommended Kegan’s 1980s tome, “The Evolving Self – problem and process in human development.” Because I’m selves-interested, I got it:

http://www.amazon.com/Evolving-Self-Problem-Process-Development/dp/0674272315/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1444683387&sr=8-1&keywords=kegan+evolving+self

It was more expensive then than it is now and it left a hole in my pocket. But it was worth it. It gave me insight into why people are like they are, and how different aspects of my selves relate to various stages in my own social development. It’s not a practical manual, but it did help me figure out how to respond helpfully to people with different social expectations.

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